Butch/Femme Photo Project

Not only has the web site for this project been created (butchfemmephotoproject.com), the book is also almost here, as well! December 15th is the release date and it's available to purchase through these links: 

http://blueskirtproductions.com/2014/11/25/blue-skirt-book-sale-now-through-december-5th/

http://www.amazon.com/Butch-Femme-Photo-Project/dp/0990765423/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1416462622&sr=8-1&keywords=Butch+femme+photo+project

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-butch-femme-photo-project-wendi-kali/1120789139?ean=9780990765424

Thank you to everyone who has supported this project! 

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The Kickstarter campaign has funded!! I will be traveling for this wonderful project and creating a book with all of the photographs and interviews! Thank you all so much for your support of this project! My heart swells with gratitude!

I am currently working on giving the project it's own web site so stay tuned for updates!

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Everyone in the world has an identity. With identities, we tend to want to give them a strict definition without recognizing that we are constantly redefining ourselves and those identities as we grow and evolve.

Within the LGBTQI community there are many identities. Among them are Butch and Femme. Both identities date back to the beginning of the 20th century and, for the most part, are part of the lesbian and bisexual sub-culture. Both have taken on many definitions and in claiming either identity, each person has their own definition and reason for doing so.

From the research I've done, I've discovered that there are many photos depicting those identities from the 50's and 60's, a few from the 70's and even fewer from the 80's and 90's. With this photo project I wish to build upon the history of Butch and Femme by adding photos of the people who claim those identities today. I hope to show how the identities have evolved by photographing the many unique and individual expressions of them.

The inspiration for this project comes from many different places but it mainly comes from my decision to finally claim the identity of Butch and the research I've done on the history of the identity within the lesbian community. In looking for photographs of women with which I can relate and identify with in the present day, I've had very little luck.

For most of my life I've looked to books to learn the ways of the world and to find myself. Two books that inspired this project the most are The Persistent Desire: A Femme-Butch Reader edited by Joan Nestle and Persistence: All Ways Butch And Femme edited by Ivan E. Coyote and Zena Sharman. Both are anthologies that contain an abundance of incredible writers. Their words paint the story of not only how these identities came about but also how they've remained a part of the community, how they are perceived today and what they might look like.

The books that I haven't been able to find are the books with the photos of Butches and Femmes with which I can identify in the present day. I hope to fill that gap with this project by creating a book with the photographs and words I collect throughout 2013.

This project is a labor of love for me. It is currently in it's infancy stage and so far only represents those butches and femmes closest to my hometown of Portland, Oregon. I have begun making my travel plans and will be traveling around the country and parts of Canada to capture those who wish to participate in this project. As of January 10th there are a total of 95 people who wish to participate and those 95 people represent 35 cities across the US and Canada. I would love to travel to your city and capture you for this project. If you are interested in participating, please send me an email at butchfemmephotoproject(at)gmail(dot)com.

If you'd like to donate to the project and make it an even bigger success, please click the Donate button and contribute what you can. Thank you so much!








Also, check out the project's Facebook page


All of the participants have volunteered for this project. I owe them my gratitude.


 

Chloe
Queer dyke & butch transwoman
26 years old
Portland, Oregon

"Transwomen and especially butch transwomen are women too. We deserve to be treated and seen as equals whether that is as community member or sexual actors. That the 'cotton ceiling' needs to be dismantled if feminism is truly about including all women."















Frances & Partner (and fur kids)
Punky funky high femme
37 years old
Portland, Oregon

"I hope that we never stop seeing femmes and butches in our big LGBTQ family. I hear folks talk about how great androgyny is and I agree there is a wonderfulness about it. However I love the nuances that a more dichotomized gender identity brings out. The way a butch with short hair smells, swaggers, and laughs. The way a femme smiles, dances, and creates mischief. We have to respect and understand people are far more than just their identity or perceived identity but we must also hold on to the beauty of being queer and gender warriors."





Michelle
Well balanced, straddling the identities of butch and femme.
38 years old
Portland, Oregon

"I want people to know that whether I'm on top or on the bottom, whether I'm in lipstick or car grease, boxers or a lacy black thong, that I am strong, capable, independent and 100 per cent woman. My identity has never been a crisis to anyone but any of those around me who might be bound and determined to pigeon hole me into one category or the other."




Marcy
Gay. Lesbian. Femme if I have to. ;)
33 years old
Portland, Oregon

"I'm stronger than I look. I spent my childhood on a farm in Nebraska. Although I work in a fancy hair salon now, I'm usually in levi's jeans a white tshirt and a baseball cap. Ford trucks make me weak. "









Belinda "Boom Boom" Carroll
Slutty
36 years old
Portland, Oregon

"I came out in 1993, and I met a butch and ID'd as femme but then went butch for a few years. After I started hanging out with queens, I realized that I love makeup and hair. I've realized recently that although femme in my dress, I'm a bit butch on the inside. It's an evolving identity. Femme does not equal precious and wilting. We are tough too."











"In the most basic terms, butch-femme means a way of looking, loving, and living that can be expressed by individuals, couples, or a community. In the past, the butch has been labeled too simplistically the masculine partner and the femme her feminine counterpart. This labeling forgets two women who have developed their styles for specific erotic, emotional, and social reasons. Butch-femme relationships, as I experienced them, were complex erotic and social statements, not phony heterosexual replicas. They were filled with a deeply lesbian language of stance, dress, gesture, love, courage, and autonomy. In the 1950s particularly, butch-femme couples were the front line warriors against sexual bigotry." - Joan Nestle, The femme question





Deb
Cis-gendered Queer Femme
46 years old
Portland, Oregon

 "I came out in the mid-80s, so there were only the options of either androgyny (the "correct" way to be a lesbian) or the old fashioned butch/femme dynamic which was frowned upon. I didn't make a very correct lesbian."






Tami
Lesbian
43 years old
Aloha, Oregon

"I am a lesbian, a mother of 4 wonderful children, a wife, a sister and lucky enough to have many close friends that I can’t imagine my life without. As I parent I knew that I needed to be a positive role model to my children (one of the reasons I divorced my husband). If I am not happy with who I am then how can they be?"

(Tami is standing next to the logo for The Girl Effect on the Nike campus in Beaverton, Oregon. The Girl Effect is a movement about the unique and indisputable potential of adolescent girls to end poverty for themselves and the world. You can read more about it on their web site.)










Denise
Sport Femme
 37 years old
Portland, Oregon

"...many times I have been ridiculed by men who think that they can "change" me back or that I haven't been with the "right" man. Wish people would accept identity without asking who's the boy or who's the girl."














Leland
Queer Leatherwoman and a switch.
Femme in certain contexts.
33 years old
Portland, Oregon

"Femme is an identity that I have been labeled with by others often, but I'm just starting to come into it as something I claim for myself. Femme, for me, is about presenting my gender in a feminine way, while still maintaining a strong Queer vibe. I'm still struggling to fully embrace Femme as an identity. I resist it because I have some negative associations with it. 

I wish more people were less inclined to make assumptions about others. I also wish our culture would more widely accept people's right to self-identify."





"Curiosity builds bridges between women and between the present and the past; judgment builds the power of some over others. Curiosity is not trivial; it is the respect one life pays to another. It is a largeness of mind and heart that refuses to be bounded by decorum or by desperation. It is hardest to keep alive in the times it is most needed., the times of hatred, of instability, of attack. Surely these are such times." - Joan Nestle, The femme question



 

Joe LeBlanc
Cajun, polyamorous, transgender, genderqueer, butch, feminist, top, rabble rouser, word whore.
 39 years old
Portland, Oregon

"I wish people knew or better understood that identity is not static. I wish others understood that because my identity is as it is, does not change anything about your own.  That there are many ways to be butch, to be transgender, to be a feminist, et al. There are multiple definitions and expressions for our identities, and that is a good thing.  The identities and words we use to describe ourselves is only the beginning of the conversation, not the be all end all about who we are.  Identity is not only personal, but it is amazing, radical and political.
 
I invite folks who are of the masculine of center variety - butch, stud, aggressive, tomboi and those who love us to check out BUTCHVoices.com and join us at any of our upcoming events and conferences."





Trace
Transgender Identified Butch
41 years old
Seattle, WA

"I wish people knew that my identity is mine. Finally finding peace in who I am is not a confrontation to their way of life nor their identification. At 41, I never thought the day would come when a person like myself could be close to having rights. Progress we made, progress we must make."









Marcy
Jewish, genderqueer, queer, human
32 years young
Portland, Oregon/West Warwick, Rhode Island

"I don't fit in, nor will I ever fit in a box. Only I can define and fully understand my identity.  It is fluid, and in the big picture of my life and life in general as I see it - identity does not matter, HEART matters. Identify my heart, see my heart, see the heart of those around me, you, and us."










  
Danni
Queer Femme, Tomboy Femme, Hard Femme
25 years old
Portland, Oregon

"Identifying as femme means that I take a (more or less) traditionally female appearance and mannerisms and queer them. I make them a little different and a little strange-in beautiful ways. I embrace the power within my female-identified self and amplify it so that it touches those around me in positive ways. My femaleness, while also a born trait, is more to me a matter of conscious and informed choice. I am not female nor femme because I was born with a vagina-I am femme because, much like well-fitted straight leg jeans and a pair of good stacked heels, it feels right and looks good on me."
  


"When we tell our stories, we change the world. I know that sounds dramatic, but I believe it. We'll never know how our stories might change someone's life - our children's, our friends', our parents', our partner's or maybe that of a stranger who hears the story down the line or reads it in a book." -Brene' Brown, Ph.D., LMSW





 Megan
Queer Femme
35 years old
Portland, Oregon

"Femme is not about what is easy nor is it about being a "typical woman."  Femmes have to be strong and confident and come out multiple times a day. We don't easily fit in either the straight or the queer world.  The straight world is not my world and as soon as I open my mouth to speak about my Love, I am put into a queer box.  The queer world often doesn't accept femme.  We are seen as "playing straight."  It's not easy to be femme, or to deal with straight men who think that they only have to hit on you just the right way for you to "swtich teams."    











Juanita
Primarily Femme but more Butch on the inside
37 years old
Vancouver, Washington

"I embrace my femininity and wear it with pride. Anyone who chooses to judge me based on the heels I wear or the make up I apply is too narrow minded to be in my world."  












Molly
Butch Fluid, Tomboy
45 years old
Portland, Oregon

"I'm just me. Plain and simple. Others need that label, I don't. I am who I am in the constructs of my own world and surroundings. Accept me for it or don't. I've grown up alot since I let go of needing acceptance of a label or title, even from myself." 
  




Mel and Erica

Erica
  Fierce, Feisty, Femme
33 years old
Vancouver, Washington

"I dress up and do my hair and fix my makeup in the morning because it makes me feel good.  It makes me feel confident and capable.  And it makes me feel attractive to the people I am attracted to.  I am crazy in love with my sexy-ass butch.  When I move in the world, I want big butches with grey hair and crinkly eyes to pay attention to me.  I move in that way, in the world.  My lipstick isn’t for 50 year old men who like feisty redheads.  My mascara isn’t for meat-head frat boys.  My heels aren’t to make other women jealous or self-conscious.  I ready myself for my days in the ways that make me most comfortable and confident.  My femininity is subversive. I infiltrate hetero-normative environments and assumptions and I blow them up with crazy queerness you never see coming. And I compliment my partner in a way that is complete and balanced and comfortable.  For me."




Mel and Erica

Mel
Female Identified Butch
42 years old
Vancouver, Washington

"Valid or not -- my definition of femininity was based largely on what one wore on their body, be it dresses, make up, or what have you. When I no longer became willing to cowtow to my mother's wishes that I 'dress like a lady' I internalized what is defined (but didn't really understand yet to be) butch. I learned later on that femininity had many more layered elements and was in no way as simple as what one put on ones body or how one decorated themselves." 



"Photographing butch is hard. I certainly would resist any photographer who wanted to photograph me for a book on butches. Butches are isolated and vulnerable. This isn't a period of celebrating butch/femme identity. 
I know in my own work the process of asking a butch to reveal herself in front of the camera brings up the sense of being even more expose in a world which has held our image up to ridicule. I am scared of continuing that. So I love it when butches emerge from the photos as completely at ease with their identities."  - Jill Posener, Photographing Butch, Dagger: On Butch Women, 1994





 Medina
Queer identified Boi-He/She
48 years old
Portland, Oregon

"I was a tomboy as a child, outed as gay in Jr High, and served as the continual annoyance of my femme step mother who never stopped saying, "You will never get a husband if you don't...", while trying to get me to "wear make-up, and sit/walk like a lady." I learned to behave in a dramatically femme fashion in order to survive what I perceived as my only options. After the hate crime murder of a gay neighbor I became active in Transgendered rights and came 'out' to more than just the LGBT community.  My heroes and roll models are my friends in the Transgendered community, who fiercely and bravely live an 'out and proud' lifestyle, while advocating for others, and my children, who accept me for who I am." 






Wendi
Butch
43 years old
Portland, Oregon

"To me, being butch means having the strength to embrace all sides of myself whether they can be defined by others as masculine or feminine. It's taken quite a bit of self growth but I've finally come to a point in my life where I can embrace all sides of myself.  Feminine, masculine, dorky, nerdy, silly, weak, strong, witty, serious, funny, emotional, artistic, boi, Daddy, etc."















Christine
Queer Femme who happens to be a Trans woman
44 years old
Portland, Oregon

"My resistance (to my identity) was born out of love and the fear of being alone.  I fell in love at an early age and spent years fighting my identity so I would be loved.  Most people love you for who you pretend to be. To keep their love, you keep pretending, performing and get locked in an image, an act."













Julie
Femme Lesbian
39 years old
Portland, Oregon

"I used to resist my identity for many reasons. Mainly because I did not see a WOC that was gay, and the few that I did were somewhat butch. After trying to suppress my sexuality for years, I chose to embrace it and bust the stereotypes that attempt to pigeon-hole us into believing we have to fit into a box for someone’s comfort." 









 Jennie
Jock, Tomboy
50 years old
Gresham, Oregon

"I've always thought of myself as a tomboy as long as I can remember. I always identified with boys better than girls. Couldn't understand their need for girly things. I just wanted to play ball and do boy things."




 Lisa
Soft Butch
48 years old
Gresham,Oregon

"Being butch does not mean I want to become a man! Being in a relationship with another butch does not confuse our sex roles. There is no "man" in our relationship, hence the word lesbian: a woman who loves women. A butch woman is still a woman. I love to receive flowers, my butch lover loves to receive flowers. We are two of the gushiest, sappiest women I've ever known."




"I waver constantly. Who should I be, where, how? Why can't I look the way I look and be a feminist, smiling when my lover calls me "her woman"? And what does this all mean to me as a black woman? I want to claim my femme-identity, recreate "femme," recreate womanhood to make it my own." -Paula Austin in her essay titled Femme-inism





Laura
Two-Spirit
42 years old
Portland, Oregon

"I'm not a typical anyone or anything. I like it that way and hope those around me do, too. I'm passionate about and see life in a way few people do. Don't be fooled by the suburban housewife persona, it's just my Selena Kyle-esque disguise. I unconditionally love every soul that makes up our LGBTQI community. Please, let's all work together..."

(Photographer's note: In the Spring of 2012, Laura was the victim of a hate crime in this exact spot. We met at a coffee shop across the street where she used to frequent before the crime. This was her first time back since the attack. In meeting me here, she wanted to re-claim her space and did so with tremendous strength and power. My heartfelt gratitude and admiration goes out to her. I feel incredibly honored to have been witness to this incredible moment.)





Helen
Butch Lesbian
34 years old
Portland, Oregon

 "I do resist the immature notion that one must be and act a certain way to be considered butch. I don't feel like I fit in with most other butch lesbians. There was a point in my younger days when I tried to conform to what I considered butch norms, and I did attract a certain kind of woman; many of them, in fact. But those were not the kinds of women I was compatible with. These days I am my own brand of butch, more refined, in a way, and I hope to attract the kind of a woman I can reasonably see myself growing old alongside."





Rhonda
Gender Fluid Butch-Femme Transwoman
71 years old
 Waldport, Oregon

"I am a female born in a male body and gender fluidity is my growing process. My local "fans" get confused when I fluctuate between different wigs and my own hair, which I am growing out. I am continuously inspired by my rainbow family who are "wind beneath my wings."








 Sunny
Butch of Center Queer Gay Dyke
Film Maker and Writer
Portland, Oregon

"Self-actualization is the path to happiness. The sooner one can fully acknowledge their authentic identity, the better one can feel about themselves, and the more they evolve."
 















Sammi interviewing God-des & She for PQ Monthly.



Sammi
Femme. Sometimes Uber Femme. Glitter Princess. Fierce Mami!
Filmmaker/Videographer
32 years old
Portland, Oregon

"Personally I feel as a femme that I am expected to wear dresses, high heels, and make-up. What is ironic is that I LOVE those girly things, passionately. After I "came out" I tried doing the Butch thing, and I felt very uncomfortable. I flip-flopped with the idea of how I wanted to represent myself as a lesbian, and I preferred wearing dresses, high-heels & lipstick as opposed to jeans, button-up shirts and ties. When I first came out, I felt that by appearing "femme", I was more or less appearing like a heterosexual woman. I battled with how to look so that I wouldn't be approached by men when out in public places. But I also recognized that by appearing as a "femme" I also was misjudged by other queer women, who assumed that I was straight.  "
  











Melissa (winking) performing with her band SuperDuperFunGun.
 Melissa
Bisexual Femme
31 years young
Portland, Oregon

 "I have never been harmed or threatened because of my identity, but I have been shunned and cast aside by many Homosexuals for being 'curious' or 'finicky'. It hurts my heart that hypocrisy can run rampant in the Queer community. Bisexuality should not suggest that we can't make up our minds. The feelings are very clear when they surface. Bisexuality is not 'Hetro-flexible'. It's not as though we identify this way because we can't get enough sex and we don't care who we get it from, or because we are afraid to come out as completely gay. I want to be a voice for Bisexuals, we shouldn't live in fear of being judged by the rest of the Queer community when other Queer types are so quickly accepted and praised. We are Bisexual, we are not confused. We don't want to be shunned because we're 'not gay enough.'"




Kristi/Ceasar
Butch Lesbian
37 years old
Drag King Performer
Mr. Neighbours 2011-2013
Auburn, Washington


"One of the main reasons I do drag is for my community, whether its showing them that its ok to be different, giving them an escape from the stressful hectic thing we call life or doing as many benefits as I can get my hands on. No matter what my communtiy comes first because I know what its like to not have anything to help us or educate us."





Redwolf
Trans, Butch, Crip, Mixed-Blood, Two-Spirit,
Queer Storyteller
42 years old
Computer Geek, Activist, Writer, Producer
Tacoma, Washington

"Butch has been an identity I have struggled with for many years. It started as an argument in the warehouse I worked when I was 24, folks telling me I was butch and me not wanting to claim it because of how much sexism I saw in the Butch/Femme community. Growing up with amazingly strong women of color gave me a healthy respect for women and the strength they carry, which is different from my own. I want to honor that strength, give it the recognition it deserves as well as own my own masculinity because it gives balance. In a society who touts masculinity to an extent of seeing any femininity as a bad thing, this identity has been and continues to be a struggle for me."








Kris
Femme Lesbian
52 years old
Business Owner/Consultant, Grandmother,
Mother, Activist, Friend, Sage, Sarcastic Observer of The World
Seattle, Washington

"I wish people knew, understood, that it’s not about playing a role—one of us is the man and one of us is the woman.  The butch/femme dynamic is about so much more than that and most people, many lesbians included, never bother to ask or learn. 
 I wish the heteronormative culture had the ability to expand beyond itself and understand that being femme and lesbian doesn’t mean you are confused and that being masculine of center doesn’t mean she wishes she were a man.  That fact that I am a lesbian is a critical part of my identity and I don’t want, and don’t accept, anyone saying “it doesn’t matter, I just see you as a person”. I get the idea behind it but that makes me invisible.   It does matter, it matters to me and influences my life and choices in everything I do.  I want straight people to get that.  Beyond that, I wish the politically correct lesbians, the “sporty” dykes, the “I don’t want a label” lesbians would simply be respectful that my identity, my gender even, is a Femme Lesbian.  And Butches need to understand it’s not a competition about who it’s harder for.  We’re Gay, it’s hard for all of us sometimes."



Linnea
Femme Dyke
44 years old
Life Coach and Artist
Vancouver, BC, Canada

"My queerness is a huge part of who I am in all things in life. Just because I don't look easily identifiable at a quick glance doesn't mean I don't feel it to the core of my being."    


Heather
Lesbian
39 years old
Burnaby, BC, Canada   

"I came to this conclusion after years of struggle with my personal identity, and trying to "act normal" like the rest of my family.  Then instantly other lesbians wanted to label me. I was called butch, soft butch, dyke etc. I hate labels and I don't think I fit into any one box because there are so many layers to me. I am who I am and who I want to be. So, plain and simple, I am a lesbian."
 

75 comments:

  1. I don't know if you are still looking for volunteers, but my partner and I are interested, if so.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes! I am! Please email me at wendikali(at)gmail(dot)com and I'll send you the questions! Thank you!

      Delete
    2. Id love to be a part of this considering at least 4 of my good friends are already on here and we've all had hours of conversation concerning gender and sexuality. My email is jamie_carter0924@yahoo.com

      Jamie

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  2. Replies
    1. Thank you thank you thank you
      This work includes and goes beyond the labels we impose upon ourselves. This takes me out of the grey abyss of androgany that as a lesbian we often cloak ourselves in. I can be seen as a femme, strong and proud a lesbian just wonderfully me! Hopefully this will help the rest of our community see the value we see in ourselves. What a joy
      Janet S.
      New Port Richey, FL

      Delete
    2. and yes volunteering is definately a yes for me!

      Delete
    3. Yes! Most excellent! Thank you so much!

      Delete
  3. Hi Wendi! Beautiful pics! My partner and I would love to be in your project! you can contact us at aurorantea@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi! Thank you! Most excellent! I sent you an email! Thank you so much!

      Delete
  4. It is so awesome to see the pictures and words describing so much diversity among those who identify as butch and/or femme. Wonderful project, Wendi, thank you for taking it on.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Kyle! It's totally a labor of love and truly comes straight from my heart.

      Delete
  5. Awesome, love the dichotomy. I id as femme, but like many here, not weak and adore the difference between butch and femme "the dance"..When i first came out I was given a hard time about dressing as a woman,,but eventually decided that is who i am..i like my femininity and love a partners butchiness,,in my mind the perfect complement.
    Thanks for the great pictures and the openness of your subjects to share,, Now could you please find some older ones? ;).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha! I would LOVE to include all ages! Thank you!

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  6. Such a fantastic project, W. I love seeing all the diversity you post.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Awesome Wendi,you really captured the true essence in each of us. I love that you did my picture in black and white too! Thank you~ let me know how I can help you raise money to venture out to other family memebers across the globe.

    ~ Denise

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    Replies
    1. Thank YOU, Denise! I've started my fundraising efforts with a "Donate" button on the page! Please share far and wide! (:

      Delete
  8. Wow, Wendi. You did an amazing job. Thank you for allowing me to participate in this project. I will come see the original 11 at the Q Center. I am a HUGE Q Center fan and an even bigger Trans Justice Rights advocate. Sending you love and peace~medina

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    Replies
    1. Thank YOU for participating! November 17th at 5pm! That's the day and the time of the art reception for the art this weekend! Hope to see you there!

      Delete
  9. This site is awesome! I stumbled upon it after poking through the Butch/Femme Kink community on facebook.

    I'd also be interested in participating if you're still accepting submissions. :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Alex!

      Send me an email at butchfemmephotoproject@gmail.com and I'll send you the questions I'm asking everyone to answer. Then, if you're close to Portland, Oregon, we'll figure out a good time for a quick photo shoot. If you're not close to Portland, I'll put you on my list of places to travel!

      Thanks!

      Delete
  10. Have you thought about starting a kickstarter project to help with funding?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, thank you. As soon as the holidays are over and life at my day job settles down a bit I will start a Kickstarter to see if travel for this project will be possible.

      Delete
  11. You need to come to NY!!! My wife and I are interested in participating, and we have many friends who are not camera shy!

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  12. Wendi, I want to support your project but it's hard when I don't see much diversity represented in your pictures. My partner and I are both Latina and it would be nice for future folks to see that we come in all shapes, sizes, skin colors as well as beautiful women who use wheelchairs, canes and walkers. So, please add more representation of all of us.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would love to! I'm hoping this project will encompass as many forms of diversity as it possibly can! Would you and your partner like to participate in the project?

      Delete
    2. Please email me at butchfemmephotoproject@gmail.com or wendikali@gmail.com!

      Delete
    3. We are here, and we do need more voices to come out and show up, not just comment that it is a problem. It helps more when you act than just speak out.

      Delete
  13. i enjoy this so much. Thank you.

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  14. Hi good start, i agree about the lack of diversity and would add age there i didn't see any pictures I could relate to at my age, 61 or older, we are still dynamite over 50. Also if you can find younger women teens, 20's that would work too. Good luck with this project, your photos are great.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes! I agree, too! Would you be willing to participate? I do want to include as many forms of diversity as possible! Email me at butchfemmephotoproject@gmail.com.

      Stay tuned, as well!

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    2. I do have others on my list who vary in age. I just need the funds to get to them!

      Delete
  15. This is an amazing project! My girl friend and I would love to participate but we're about 945 miles away from you haha. But I love this and I can't wait to see more. :)

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    1. That's why I've got a Kickstarter campaign going to raise funds to travel for the project! http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/wendikali/the-butch-femme-photo-project Please share far and wide!

      If you'd like to participate, please email me at butchfemmephotoproject@gmail.com!

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  16. My partner and I would very much like to participate in your project! We are near Los Angeles, if that's helpful. Please email me at rainbowkat77@yahoo.com.

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  17. As a woman coming out at 50, I so needed to hear the words ..."I want people to know that whether I'm on top or on the bottom, whether I'm in lipstick or car grease, boxers or a lacy black thong, that I am strong, capable, independent and 100 per cent woman. My identity has never been a crisis to anyone but any of those around me who might be bound and determined to pigeon hole me into one category or the other." .... THX!

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    1. Excellent! This is exactly why I am so passionate about this project! You are most welcome!

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  18. Absolutely fabulous. Every one an individual. I really needed to see this as, as a "Latebloomer" 50 odd and having fit into a straight framework all my life, I have been struggling to see at times where I now fit. I fit fine!! Many thanks!!

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  19. future locations are??????

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    1. The coast! I will be emailing you and a couple other people out your way! I want to get out there in the next couple of weekends!

      Also, I'm hoping to get up to Seattle, Tacoma and Olympia next month!

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  20. Love this project! I'm butch identified and in a butch/femme relationship AND I help lesbians create stronger relationships. It's great that you're putting this out in the world so that everyone can see and appreciate the variety of identities and relationships we enjoy in our community. Thanks!

    Christine @ http://LesbianLoveGuru.com

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  21. I wish i could see more butch/butch couples.but I love your project. Do you plan on coming to NYC?

    Leah
    Leahhers@yahoo.com

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    1. Hi Leah! I hope more Butch/Butch couples participate in the project! If the Kickstarter campaign funds, I will definitely be coming to NYC!

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  22. My name is Josh, I am transgendered, I am almost completely post-op. Just started the beginning stages of my lower surgery. I am Jewish, live in Dallas, TX. Would love to volunteer for your photo shoot in the project. Let me know if you plan on being in TX anytime soon.

    email me at jsbean18_2003@yahoo.com

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    1. Thank you, Josh! I just sent you an email!

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  23. Feel free to come to England!

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    1. I would LOVE to! My partner and I are hoping to visit Cornwall in 2014!

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  24. I just came across this and I must say I think it's great! I would love to be involved in this if ever you make it down south. I am a lady that loves ladies just as much as men's clothing. Call me what you want, but I am who I am, and at 22 it feels damn good to say that!

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    1. Thank you! Email me at butchfemmephotoproject@gmail.com and I'll send you more info and questions!

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  25. This is fantastic. I plan to donate before the end of the day tomorrow! If you get to Charleston SC, my partner and I would love to be involved. You are doing a fantastic job and I hope this becomes total reality for you!

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    1. Thank you, Lynn! The Kickstarter ends tomorrow at 1:45 PST! Send me an email at butchfemmephotoproject@gmail.com and I'll send you more info on how to participate!

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  26. Love it! Just wrote to you to see if you need anymore peeps for the project. Keep up the great work :)

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  27. great stuff, appreciate your work.. Ashly.

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  28. I love the work you're going and I'm looking forward to seeing more!

    I would really like to share what you're doing with my audience and connect with you more. You're doing something really powerful here. If you're interested in chatting you can email me at Christine@LesbianLoveGuru.com

    Christine

    http://www.LesbianLoveGuru.com

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  29. awesome photography and the subjects are very unique and lovely..tina

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  30. Hi Wendi, this is spectacular! Kudos and respct. I just found your blog and the Butch/Femme project is stellar. I love that it's more than photos...that you include each person's truth about themselves. Do you keep in contact with Laura from Portland? I had looked at her photo then read about the hate crime and wondered how she was doing.
    Thanks.
    Looking forward to more of your labor of love. ~P.J. Michigan

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    1. Thank you so much! Laura is doing really well and chose that spot to bring closure to the hate crime that happened to her there. She's an incredibly strong woman.

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